Hong Kong / Updated on

One Day in Hong Kong: A Photo Essay

Once again I've packed my belongings. After two and a half years, everything I own still fits inside two bags. The meaning I place on “things” has gone down significantly in recent years. No longer am I constantly seeking “stuff” to pack on top of my other “stuff.” Now I seek experience to stack on top of my previous experience.

And now, my experience extends into Asia.

Now that I've gotten over the fact that everybody is Asian (it's overwhelming), I've started to see what lies within the culture, though still from a very fresh, outsiders perspective. The street markets are thronged with locals and travelers alike, the vendors offering up splendors from fresh meat and fish to counterfeit handbags and cheap electronics.

Street Markets in Hong Kong

The markets are dirty, but they teem with character. Locals buy the food, foreigners buy the handbags. Some are found down alleyways in major city centers. It seems unlikely, but it's common.

Street Markets in Hong Kong

Food-heaven exists here. And the best food comes from the street vendors. Though Michelin Star dim sum is tasty too. Like these steamed shrimp dumplings.

Steamed shrimp dumplings (har kau)

Or pork spare ribs in a black bean sauce.

Pork spare ribs in black bean sauce

Temples and monasteries abound in Hong Kong. The Buddha, of course, is hugely significant to this culture.

The Big Buddha, Hong Kong

I felt troubled, entering these temples as a tourist. White people were everywhere, snapping photos and laughing. These are places of worship and should be respected and treated as such. However, despite my feelings of exploitation, I went ahead and did just the same.

The Big Buddha, Hong Kong

The Wisdom Path is a walkway through an arrangement of giant wood columns, representing, as a whole, the Heart of the Prajna-Paramita Sutra, literally, “The Heart of the Perfection of Transcendent Wisdom.”

The Wisdom Path

Hong Kong is a magnificent city.

Hong Kong

And there is still so much more to explore.

Just don't forget your Hong Kong tourist visa before jetting off.


READ NEXT: Wandering the Streets of China: An Introspection. Is This Culture Shock?

Send this to a friend